November 20, 2016

Taking in the great outdoors is suppose to be lovely. Hiking with friends during the day and watching the stars at night, until that awkward moment when you are all sitting around the campfire in complete silence.

Determined to think of a discussion topic you try starting conversation, and discussion after discussion falls flat.

Games are slightly childish and silly, but they are meant to be fun and bring forth laughter. With out list of nine camping games for adults you will easily be able to turn awkward silence into a good time anytime.

Our games range from silly stories to brainpowerdriven, letting you easily find a game well suited for your group of adult friends.

Alison Lawrence

1. Grey’s Anatomy

This game can be played with anyone that understands basic anatomy. However, if you are a doctor or nurse, remember that not everyone knows what the “common bile duct” is and stick to more normal body parts. I learned this lesson the hard way.

How to play: Pick any body part and briefly give a description, then everyone around the campfire will try to guess which one you described.

For example: I would say, “pale-red, rough, strong” and eventually someone would correctly guess “tongue.” Continue moving around the circle in a clockwise direction. It may seem ridiculous, but this dorky word game gets your brain thinking, while different groups can take it in any direction – from erotic to medically correct.

2. Never Ever Have I

This game is all about making your innocent friend blush. It is the classic game of American adolescents, but rather fun to play as an adult once you have some life experiences under your belt.

How to play: The person going first will start with the words “Never ever have I…” and then fill in the blank with an action. After their proclamation, everyone in the group that has done that action will have to raise their hand. Honestly, it is a hilarious way to get people to spill dirt, while your innocent friend continuously blushes.

For example: I would say, “Never ever have I fed my kids cake for breakfast.” Everyone in the circle that had fed their kids cake for breakfast would have to raise their hands. Of course, you can get much more creative with your statements.

3. Two Truths & A Lie

How well do you think you know your friends? This game will test your knowledge and poker face.

How to play: The first person has to come up with two truths and one lie to tell the group. The three sentences can be in any order, but must be statements about themselves: “I have/did/was…” Whoever correctly guesses the person’s lie wins.

For example: “I climbed Island Peak in Nepal, I got chased by a bear in the Adirondacks, and I have been helicopter into fifteen rescue missions in the Sierra.” My lie is that I have never been chased by a bear, and therefore whoever guesses that wins.Then move on to the next person. This game is also a great way to get to know interesting facts about people, and can be played in a “get to know you” fashion.

4. Pop Ghost Story

Do you really believe that adults are not scared of the dark? Testing this theory in a remote, ominous, fearsome forest will tell you which friend you can count on when the Yeti appears and whom will running for the tent. It might be best to not send anyone to bed alone after this game.

How to play: There are a few ways to play, but the goal is to allow everyone to pitch into the storytelling. Decide if you want to have a word or sentence limit or just keep switching off, but the gist is that someone will start the story. It can begin as simply as, “Once upon a time…” or “In a dark forest, far away from any help…” Continue to let the story run around the circle, see what you create, and try not too get too scared. I would hate for you to be the one tucked in the tent when the Yeti comes.

For example: Person one says, “Once upon a time in a lonely village, tucked away in the remote mountains…” Person two picks up, “there lived a young girl who thought…” Person three continues, “that all men where pure of heart and that no hard could come to her way of life…” Then person four would begin.

5. The Five Letter Game

Are you missing your morning crossword puzzle? This game will surely provide your brain with stimulation.

How to play: One main person needs to select a five letter word that does not have any repeated letters. The others will guess five letter words, which can have repeated words. The main person will reply with the number of letters the words have in common, until the group is able to accurately guess the chosen word. Once everyone gets the hang of it, try making the game harder by not allow the use of pen and paper.

For example: The main person selects the word “truck.” Someone else guesses “mouse.” Then the main person would reply with “1.” If you then guess “house” and the reply is also 1, you know that there is no “m” in the chosen word.

6. The Alphabet Game

Here is another brain game for you!

How to play: First, select a topic. Then go around in a circle starting with the letter “A” and working your way to “Z.” You will have to stay something that starts with your assigned letter. You gain a point if you cannot think of something with that letter, but only if someone in your group can. The person with the lowest point score at the end of the game wins.

For example: I select the topic, Places In California. A: Auburn, B: Baden, C: Coldwater, E: Eureka… W: Walnut Creek, X:? If I cannot think of anything then I will gain a point, but only if someone else know that XL Ranch is actually a place with a zip code in California.

7. The Classic Charades

Nearly everyone has played this before, but little do we remember how fun it is until we play again.

How to play: Take a piece of paper and rip it into scrap pieces. Have everyone write down a few ideas of people, movies, book titles, or songs and place the paper into a hat (or backpack pocket). Then, preferably in front of the campfire, one at a time, have a person pull out a piece of paper from the hat. Then they need to stand in front of the group and act it out (no talking allowed), while everyone else guesses. At the bringing of their skit they can state, in hand motions, what category their selection is from (film, book, song) and how many words.

For example: If I selected “Ops I Did It Again,” I would sign “song” and then “five words” before starting to act it out. Once someone guessed the answer or the timer ran out it would be the next persons turn.

Tips: This game can be played individually, but tends to be more fun if the group is broken up into two teams. Additionally, have a timer, since no one likes to get stuck acting something out for ten minutes and it will wreck the mood. Instead, laugh it off if after two or three minutes everyone still has no idea what you are attempting to sign, and move on. (Be aware, it is inevitable that every group will have one signer that is horrific – just be patient and do not let them get frustrated with themselves. It is all part of the game.)

8. Starry Bullshit

How good are you at naming the constellations? This game will replies on mythological knowledge, a good poker face, and extremely gullible friends.

How to play: The first person has to select a set of stars and name the constellation’s title. Additionally, they need to tell a brief story about that constellation in the Greek mythology style (although, all cultural constellations and stories are allowed). Then, the each individual in the group needs to say “truth” or all “bullshit.” If the person was making it up and they get “bullshit” called on them then they gain a point. However, if you call bullshit and the story is historically accurate you get the point. The person with the fewest points at the end of the game wins.

For example: I would say, “Do you see those three stars? They make up Andrea’s Belt. She once fought the father of all gods, Zeus, when he refused to free her brother after he had stolen a plate from Zeus’ kitchen. To teach a lesson to all other gods he captured Andrea and whipped her with her own belt. The backlash created this constellation as a constant reminder to always obey those above you.”

The three stars constellation is actually known as Orion’s Belt.Orion, the son of the sea-god Neptune and Queen Euryale of the Amazonians,was a mythological hunter who was killed by a single scorpion after his ego became too large. In another version of the story, Apollo worried about Diana’s chastity and sent the scorpion after Orion.Either way, whoever calls “bullshit” on me will be correct. And inevitably I will gain a point.

9. Camp Song

Let’s just admit that sometimes it is really fun to be silly and forget the troubles and stresses of adult life. This game will let you do exactly that! After all, nothing is better than a good old campfire song!

How to play: Come up with a short song, which you sing as a group and then abruptly end, and one person needs to complete the line. Then everyone jump back in and the song continuously repeats itself.

For example: Everyone sings, “Oh what fun it is to be here in the mountain. I just love the sunny hillsides and open skies. Life is great, except for when…” Everyone stops. Then one person gets stuck creating the next line: “Tim got us lost on the trail for two hours.” (It is fun to pull from real life events from previous in the day.) Then everyone joins back in, and it starts all over again.

Let Us Know Your Favorite Game

Did you enjoy our list? Please feel free to share these games with your friends before heading out on your next trip. If you think we missed something, comment bellow to share your favorite campfire games. Best of all, share your most memorable moments and laughs!

Alison Lawrence

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